Screenwriter Spotlight: Finalist Questionnaire (Jim Norman & Brian Trim)

Screenwriter Spotlight: Finalist Questionnaire (Jim Norman & Brian Trim)

(Jordan Bonn)

By Jen B.

Jim Norman

What’s your name and where are you from?  

Jim Norman. Originally from Union, N.J., I live in Plantation, FL.

What’s the title of your screenplay?

“Back in Business.”

What’s the logline and how did you come up with the concept for your screenplay?

Logline: It’s been years since an elderly couple operated a Catskills resort hotel and they miss the business. They’ve sold the land where the hotel once stood and decide to use some of the money by opening a bed and breakfast in a place they know little about: Key West, home and playground of unique characters.  Concept: My protagonists were loved by everyone who read a prior screenplay.  I decided to use them again, this time in a sitcom.

Tell us about your history as a screenwriter. Where did your journey begin?

I started writing when I retired from practicing law some eight years ago.  I’d always written, but not screenplays. The jump from short stories to screenplays was not difficult.

What motivates you to be a screenwriter or filmmaker?  

The joy of storytelling.  Making people laugh or tear-up. Creating an escape from the real world for people who read my screenplays or watch the movies made from them.

What is the biggest challenge you have encountered as a screenwriter and filmmaker?

Really learning the craft to a level equal to the working professionals.  I started late, so I work to catch up fast.

What’s the most important thing you want audiences to take away when watching your films or reading your screenplays.

Understanding the theme and just enjoying the time spent on my characters and my words.

Ideally, where do you see yourself in 5 years?

Hopefully, still writing screenplays, some of which have been produced.

What’s your favorite film of all time? If you can’t single out a film, give us your top 3.

“My Cousin Vinny,” “When Harry Met Sally” and “Young Frankenstein.” If you allowed a fourth: “In the Heat of the Night.”

What’s your earliest favorite childhood movie?

“The Wizard of Oz.”

Who’s your favorite cinema hero?

Clint Eastwood’s characters in his westerns.

Who’s your personal hero?  Among writers:

Nora Ephron.

Brian Trim

What’s your name and where are you from?

Brian Trim/Bergen County New Jersey

What’s the title of your screenplay?

Money Shot

What’s the logline and how did you come up with the concept for your screenplay?

Caught between the mob, his own conscience and the dangerous world of porn, a diffident young filmmaker comes to find out that he has more in common with what he’s been trying to escape than with what he thinks he’s working towards. The concept came from the idea to create a period piece with a main character who in his absolute pursuit of his goals, inadvertently loses sight of everything that really matters in life. Kind of a Walter White meets Bob Guccione meets Tony Soprano thing. The reason for setting the pilot in the 70’s is because classically the era is known as the “Golden Age of Porn”.

Tell us about your history as a screenwriter. Where did your journey begin?

I’ve always been an artist. I grew up watching movies but my journey started in music and then led into film and television production as a sound mixer and camera operator. I realized after a period of time and after watching others make the movies and shows they wanted to make that it was time for me to start writing the movies and shows that I had in my head and dreamed of turning into reality.

What motivates you to be a screenwriter or filmmaker?

My motivation comes from my love of the process of taking the ideas in my head and turning them into stories.

What is the biggest challenge you have encountered as a screenwriter and filmmaker?

I’m loving every second of this.

What’s the most important thing you want audiences to take away when watching your

films or reading your screenplays. I want people to be moved and to be inspired and entertained. I want them to laugh, to cry and maybe even get mad. I simply want them to feel emotion. That to me is one of the greatest things about making art of any kind.

Ideally, where do you see yourself in 5 years?

Running my own incredibly successful production company.

What’s your favorite film of all time? If you can’t single out a film, give us your top 3.

Pulp Fiction (a cliche’ I know but the movie made non-linear story telling cool and made seemingly mundane subject matter exciting)

What’s your earliest favorite childhood movie?

Star Wars (another cliche’ but George Lucas is a freaking genius. It’s also one of the greatest and most classic stories of all time) Sound of people throwing thingsat me.

Who’s your favorite cinema hero?

Gary “Hollywood” Wood. Yes he’s my creation and the protagonist in my pilot and I love him. At least until I write my next favorite hero.

Who’s your personal hero?

Tarantino..

What’s that you say? Another cliche’?

That’s probably true and I probably don’t care

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